CYPRESS — The unsung heroes and heroines of the football field, and any sporting event, are the student trainers. While Adam Sandler’s 1998 emotionally moving piece about sports team support staff, The Waterboy, popularized the many people a football team needs to run efficiently, the real-life experience is vastly different.

A freshman CFISD HS #12 football hopeful drinks water during a water break during the first day of “two a days” practice at CFISD HS #12 High School. (Cypress News Review photo by Creighton Holub)

The high school level of football also enables student trainers to get experience under the collective trained eyes of medical professionals and trained coaches. “It goes back to kids being involved,” said CFISD HS #12 Bears athletics coordinator David Raffield. The head coach explained that 80 percent of the high school’s student body is involved in at least one extracurricular activity. “(In the case of football) our kids are never more than 10-15 meters from water.” The Bear football team had plenty of student trainers ready to keep players ready to unleash their full potential and stay hydrated so they can learn on the field. “If you need a drink, get a drink,” he added.

A freshman CFISD HS #12 football hopeful drinks water during a water break during the first day of “two a days” practice at CFISD HS #12 High School. (Cypress News Review photo by Creighton Holub)

It also lets high school students get an idea of what can be waiting for them in future professional pursuits. Everything from wrapping ankles and wrists can educate future doctors, nurses and paramedics. “I want to be an orthopedic surgeon,” said freshman Rebecca Norris, who was proudly wearing a cast at the first day of football two-a-days. She explained that she’s broken bones 10 times, starting as a three-year-old. “My sister did (student training), too.”

Freshmen Jackie Averill, Mikayla Hiett and Rebecca Norris keep a watchful eye on freshman CFISD HS #12 football hopefuls during the first day of “two a days” practice at CFISD HS #12 High School. (Cypress News Review photo by Creighton Holub)

Norris and some of her fellow CFISD HS #12 student trainers share medical profession aspirations. “I want to go into the medical field,” Jackie Averill, another freshman, said. “I want to become a doctor or surgeon.” Along with them, freshman Mikayla Hiett wants to help others. “I like helping wherever I can,” Hiett explained. “I want to become a pediatric surgeon.” Helping to lead the charge was sophomore Colby Castle, who has been a student trainer going into his second year. Last year he assisted the football, baseball and softball teams. “I just enjoy being outside,” he added.